C8U4G3
C8U4G3 62
Kitchen Sink
East Capitol St NE & First St SE, Washington, DC 20004

C8U4G3 Sampling info

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Essential City Water Test

State of your water

  • Why are you testing your water?
  • Do you think something is wrong with your water?
  • Does your water taste funny?
    Does your water appear unclean?
  • Is your water leaving a white film where it is used?

Plumbing and treatment

  • How old is your plumbing?
    NEW 5-10years 10-20years 20-40years 40+years Don'tknow
  • Do your water fixtures show signs of corrosion?

Please tell us how you learned about Tap Score

Sampling Info C8U4G3
Location
Address
Date
Time
Collected By
Water Source
On-Site Treatment
Essential City Water Test

State of your water

Why are you testing your water?
Do you think something is wrong with your water?
Does your water taste funny?
Does your water appear unclean?
Is your water leaving a white film where it is used?

Plumbing and treatment

How old is your plumbing?
NEW 5-10years 10-20years 20-40years 40+years Don'tknow
Do your water fixtures show signs of corrosion?

Please tell us how you learned about Tap Score

Dear Example Customer,
This is your TAP SCORETM Report

BASED ON LABORATORY TESTING AND ANALYSIS YOUR TAP SCORE IS 62 (POOR)

According to SimpleWater Recommendations, which are based on guidelines established by Federal and State agencies as well as leading academic research, the water samples you provided for testing demonstrate your water quality is Poor. This means your sample contained at least one harmful contaminant in excess of health recommendations, or a variety of smaller hazards. Please review your Report and contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

C8U4G3 - Essential City Water Test
Ordered Aug 11, 2019

browse your report
62

General properties of your water

The following section describes general indicators of your overall water quality. These parameters may not directly impact your health but they will influence the chemical nature of metals and other potential contaminants in your water supply.

  • pH
    8.2
    BASIC

    A measure of how acidic or basic your water is. A low pH may impart a bitter metallic taste and cause corrosion. High pH water may cause a baking soda-like taste and leave deposits on your fixtures. Unlike most other parameters, pH properly measured on-site is more accurate than pH measured in the lab.

    LEARN MORE
  • Alkalinity
    50PPM
    normal

    Determined by the properties of minerals dissolved in your water. It's a measure of your water's capacity to resist changes to pH. Strongly alkaline water has an objectionable taste that resembles baking soda.

    LEARN MORE
  • TDS
    408PPM
    normal

    TDS is a measurement of all the Total Dissolved Solids we found in your water. Some contaminants raise your TDS, while others do not. Water containing high TDS will often smell bad and taste bitter, salty or metallic.

    LEARN MORE
  • Sodium Adsorption Ratio
    2.47
    normal

    SAR is a factor in determining suitability of water for irrigation. It does not have direct health effects. In general, a higher sodium adsorption ratio means water is less suitable for use in irrigation. If you have an on-site water treatment system, expect SAR to be high.

    LEARN MORE

Pipe health summary

The following section describes key parameters influencing the health of your pipes and treatment hardware.

  • Iron
    0.269PPM
    normal

    At moderate concentrations, iron will give water an unpleasant, metallic taste. Less than 1 PPM of iron may cause reddish-brown stains on your water fixtures and clothing.

    LEARN MORE
  • Calcium
    14PPM
    normal

    Calcium has its own taste receptors on your tongue. A high concentration can taste bitter or sour. Some people enjoy the flavor it imparts on their water, but too much of it contributes to hardness and can form scale in your pipes.

    LEARN MORE
  • Magnesium
    2PPM
    normal

    While magnesium can make your water taste better, too much of it can contribute to hard water and form scale in your pipes.

    LEARN MORE
  • Manganese
    0.024PPM
    normal

    Above 0.050 PPM you may notice a metallic taste, brownish-black or brownish-red color on toilets, shower curtains and sinks. Levels of manganese above 0.02 PPM may stain clothing.

    LEARN MORE
  • Grains per gallon
    3.88Grains
    Normal

    Elevated water hardness affects pipe maintenance, water taste, and the ability of your water to form soap bubbles (laundry, dish washing, showering etc).

    LEARN MORE
  • Hardness (Total)
    64.71PPM
    Normal

    Total hardness is the sum of all hardness-contributing metals and minerals in your water. Mostly representative of calcium and magnesium, total hardness also includes contributions by barium, copper, zinc, iron, strontium and more. Water hardness may cause scaling and bad tasting tap water. Hardness contributes to white film on glassware and can make soap bubbles difficult to form.

    LEARN MORE
  • Hardness (Ca, Mg)
    96.8PPM
    normal

    Mostly representative of the calcium and magnesium in your water. Hard water may cause your water to taste unpleasant and is known to leave residues on water fixtures, be harmful to your pipes and make it difficult to form bubbles when using soaps.

    LEARN MORE
  • Langelier Saturation Index
    -0.33
    NORMAL

    The Langelier Saturation Index is calculated based on your sample's chemistry and is assuming cold water. It's used as an indicator of the corrosive or scale forming potential of your water.

Aesthetics C8U4G3

Aesthetic properties

Taste Color

Likely sources of taste

Of the things that we detected in your sample, these are the ones most likely to be affecting your water's taste.

  • Zinc 12.5 PPM

    High zinc concentrations may impart a bitter or metallic taste to drinking water.

  • Iron 0.269 PPM

    Even relatively moderate iron concentrations may impart a metallic or bitter taste in drinking water.

What can improve my water?

Likely sources of discoloration

Of the things that we detected in your sample, these are the ones most likely to be affecting your water's color.

  • Aluminum 0.2 PPM

    Aluminum levels above .05 PPM may cause discoloration of drinking water.

What can improve my water?

Water temperature, general chemistry and other differences in human sensitivity will all impact how inorganic or organic contaminants alike affect drinking water smell, taste, and color. In general, cool water is more palatable than warm water. Higher water temperature increases chemical volatility and may also increase growth rates for microorganisms.

Watch list

THESE ARE THE MOST NOTABLE RESULTS FROM YOUR SAMPLE.

For an exhaustive list of all the parameters tested in your sample, check the "All Results" section.

Pb Metal
Lead Measurement: 0.006 PPM Lead (Metal) 0.006 PPM
Exceeds federal goal (MCL-G) of 0 PPM
HEALTH EFFECTS

US EPA enforces a 15 PPB limit on lead in drinking water, but no amount of lead is considered safe. It accumulates in your body and has multiple toxic effects on your brain, liver, kidney and bones. Children are especially vulnerable to lead poinsoning, in particular, to damage affecting the brain and nervous system.

Nervous System
Adrenal
Kidneys(lower evidence)
Liver(lower evidence)
COMMON SOURCES

Lead is a heavy metal that most often enters your water by corrosion of aging pipes, household plumbing systems, from the erosion of natural deposits nearby and by industrial activity waste streams. Changes in water chemistry (pH) can have a substantial impact on the release of lead into your water.

TASTE & ODOR: 
You cannot see, taste or smell lead in your drinking water.
Ni Metal
Nickel Measurement: 0.092 PPM Nickel (Metal) 0.092 PPM
Exceeds Simplewater's recommendation of 0.012 PPM
HEALTH EFFECTS   Possible Carcinogen

Nickel can be a potent human carcinogen at high doses. In lower doses, it can lead to decreased lung function and allergic reactions. About 10-20% of the US population is sensitive to nickel.

Other(lower evidence)
COMMON SOURCES

Nickel is a naturally occurring element commonly found in earth's bedrock, as well as in the waste water from mining and smelting activities.

TASTE & ODOR: 
Nickel compounds have no characteristic taste or odor.
Zn Metal
Zinc Measurement: 12.5 PPM Zinc (Metal) 12.5 PPM
Exceeds Simplewater's recommendation of 5 PPM
HEALTH EFFECTS

Zinc is an essential nutrient, however drinking water with high levels of zinc can lead to stomach cramps, nausea and vomiting.

Other(lower evidence)
Gastrointestinal(lower evidence)
COMMON SOURCES

Zinc may enter your drinking water supply from natural erosion of soil and other bedrock or from artificial pathways. Zinc is commonly found in the waste by-products of steel production, coal-fired power stations, and the burning of waste materials. Zinc is used in some fertilizers that may leach into groundwater. Older galvanized metal pipes and well cribbings may be coated with zinc that can be dissolved by soft, acidic waters over time.

TASTE & ODOR: 
Metallic Taste
Chr Metal
Chromium (Total) Measurement: 0.15 PPM Chromium (Total) (Metal) 0.15 PPM
Exceeds federal legal limit (MCL) of 0.1 PPM
HEALTH EFFECTS   Possible Carcinogen

Total chromium, as sampled in water and the environment, takes two principal forms: trivalent chromium (i.e. chromium III) and hexavalent chromium (i.e. chromium VI). Chromium VI is a potent human carcinogen according to the International Agency for Research on Cancers. It affects the human liver and kidney, and is known to cause circulatory disorders, as well as nerve damage. While chromium III is an essential human nutrient, excess of chromium III can cause illness and skin rash. However, it is not as severe a health concern as chromium VI.

Developmental
Reproductive (M)
Reproductive (F)
Kidneys
Gastrointestinal
Liver
Blood
Respiratory
Other(lower evidence)
Adrenal(lower evidence)
Nervous System(lower evidence)
COMMON SOURCES

The most common source of total chromium (and chromium VI) in drinking water is from the waste of nearby mining activity, electroplating and pigment factories. Chromium may also enter your water supply during erosion from natural deposits.

Other findings

THESE ARE THE CONTAMINANTS WE DETECTED BELOW POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS LEVELS.

  • Aluminum show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.2 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Aluminum in drinking water may potentially be toxic to the nervous system, with possible links to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Studies linking aluminum to human health remain inconclusive.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Aluminum can come into contact with drinking water sources from natural formations underground or from direct use as a water treatment coagulant or additive. It may also be released by metal refineries and mining operations.

    LEARN MORE
  • Iron show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.269 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Essential for your health vis-a-vis the transport of oxygen in your blood, iron in your drinking water may nonetheless cause stomach illness and other chronic pain, depending on your genetic makeup.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Iron is commonly found in most home drinking water. It comes from natural sources–like bedrock and soil–as well as from rusting pipes and water fixtures.

    TASTE & ODOR
    At moderate concentrations, iron will give water an unpleasant, metallic taste. Less than 1 PPM of iron may cause reddish-brown stains on your water fixtures and clothing.

    LEARN MORE
  • Lithium show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.61 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Chronic oral exposure to high doses of lithium over time can disrupt the normal functioning of the thyroid gland, eventually leading to goiter (swelling of the thyroid gland). Lithium in drinking water has also interestingly been associated with reduced mental illness.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Lithium is a common element in the earth's bedrock. It can also enter your drinking water when there is contamination by leaking batteries, AC units, grease, electric cars, or pharmaceuticals.

    TASTE & ODOR
    There is no taste, odor, or color associated with high levels of lithium in drinking water.

    LEARN MORE
  • Strontium show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.839 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Ingestion of small amounts of strontium is not harmful. With long-term chronic exposure at concentrations above 4 PPM, strontium may affect bone growth and impact children. There is less evidence suggesting impact on adults. High concentrations of radioactive strontium isotope, strontium-90 may cause cancer.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Dust, soil, foods and drinking water all contain small amounts of strontium. Geologic weathering leads to naturally-occurring strontium in the environment. Strontium-90 occurrence may also be linked to nuclear fallout and other anthropogenic sources such as air contamination from milling processes, coal burning, and phosphate fertilizers. However, high levels of strontium can occur in water drawn from bedrock aquifers that are rich in strontium minerals.

    LEARN MORE
  • Total Dissolved Solids show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    408 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    TDS is a general characteristic of water and does not itself have known health effects. However, the particulate materials that can cause high TDS may be harmful to human health.

    COMMON SOURCES
    As water travels over the land surface and through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals. TDS is a measure of all those dissolved particles in your water. It is a general characteristic of water rather than a specific chemical.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Water containing high TDS will often smell bad and taste bitter, salty or metallic

    LEARN MORE
  • Fluoride show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.98 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    High levels of fluoride in drinking water (>4 PPM) can cause bone disease and dental fluorosis. Such concentrations are rarely reached in public water systems and much more likely in private well water. Increasingly, there has been some research into the health effects of lower concentrations of fluoride when consumed in drinking water. It's unclear whether low concentrations of fluoride have negative health effects.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Fluoride in drinking water is commonly added by public water systems as an additive to protect teeth. Natural fluoride is also eroded from soil and rock deposits, used as a fertilizer, and commonly in the wastewater of aluminum intensive industries. It's unclear whether low concentrations of fluoride (added to water by public water systems) have any dental benefits considering how little time tap water stays in contact with your teeth (compared to toothpaste).

    LEARN MORE
  • Phosphorous show less
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    1.8 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Phosphorous concentrations found in drinking water are not associated with any health effects.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Phosphorus is commonly found in groundwater concentrations near agriculturally active areas because it is a common ingredient in fertilizer. Public water systems will also commonly add phosphates to the drinking water as a corrosion inhibitor to prevent lead and copper from leaching into your water from pipes and fixtures.

    LEARN MORE
  • Hardness show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    96.8 PPM
  • Grains per gallon show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    3.88 Grains
  • Manganese show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.024 PPM
  • Potassium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    3 PPM
  • Hardness (Total) show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    64.71 PPM
  • Molybdenum show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    19 PPM
  • Alkalinity (as CaCO3) show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    50 PPM
  • Calcium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    14 PPM
  • Thallium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.00014 PPM
  • Sodium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    7 PPM
  • Boron show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.003 PPM
  • Magnesium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    2 PPM

To view the full list of everything tested in your sample, scroll to the 'Your full results' section.

Your full results

THIS IS A COMPLETE OVERVIEW OF WHAT WAS TESTED IN YOUR SAMPLE.

  • pH show more 8.2 (BASIC)
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    The pH of your water is a measure of your water's hydronium concentration, or measure of acidity / basicity.

    COMMON SOURCES
    The pH of your water is a measure of your water's hydronium concentration, or measure of acidity / basicity.

    TASTE & ODOR
    A measure of how acidic or basic your water is. A low pH may impart a bitter metallic taste and cause corrosion. High pH water may cause a baking soda-like taste and leave deposits on your fixtures. Unlike most other parameters, pH properly measured on-site is more accurate than pH measured in the lab.

    LEARN MORE
  • Lead show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.006 PPM
    Exceeds federal goal (MCL-G) of 0 PPM (MCL is 0.015)
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    US EPA enforces a 15 PPB limit on lead in drinking water, but no amount of lead is considered safe. It accumulates in your body and has multiple toxic effects on your brain, liver, kidney and bones. Children are especially vulnerable to lead poinsoning, in particular, to damage affecting the brain and nervous system.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Lead is a heavy metal that most often enters your water by corrosion of aging pipes, household plumbing systems, from the erosion of natural deposits nearby and by industrial activity waste streams. Changes in water chemistry (pH) can have a substantial impact on the release of lead into your water.

    TASTE & ODOR
    You cannot see, taste or smell lead in your drinking water.

    LEARN MORE
  • Nickel show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.092 PPM
    Exceeds Simplewater's recommendation of 0.012 PPM (MCL is 0.1)
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Nickel can be a potent human carcinogen at high doses. In lower doses, it can lead to decreased lung function and allergic reactions. About 10-20% of the US population is sensitive to nickel.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Nickel is a naturally occurring element commonly found in earth's bedrock, as well as in the waste water from mining and smelting activities.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Nickel compounds have no characteristic taste or odor.

    LEARN MORE
  • Zinc show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    12.5 PPM
    Exceeds Simplewater's recommendation of 5 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Zinc is an essential nutrient, however drinking water with high levels of zinc can lead to stomach cramps, nausea and vomiting.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Zinc may enter your drinking water supply from natural erosion of soil and other bedrock or from artificial pathways. Zinc is commonly found in the waste by-products of steel production, coal-fired power stations, and the burning of waste materials. Zinc is used in some fertilizers that may leach into groundwater. Older galvanized metal pipes and well cribbings may be coated with zinc that can be dissolved by soft, acidic waters over time.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Metallic Taste

    LEARN MORE
  • Chromium (Total) show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.15 PPM
    Exceeds federal legal limit (MCL) of 0.1 PPM
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Total chromium, as sampled in water and the environment, takes two principal forms: trivalent chromium (i.e. chromium III) and hexavalent chromium (i.e. chromium VI). Chromium VI is a potent human carcinogen according to the International Agency for Research on Cancers. It affects the human liver and kidney, and is known to cause circulatory disorders, as well as nerve damage. While chromium III is an essential human nutrient, excess of chromium III can cause illness and skin rash. However, it is not as severe a health concern as chromium VI.

    COMMON SOURCES
    The most common source of total chromium (and chromium VI) in drinking water is from the waste of nearby mining activity, electroplating and pigment factories. Chromium may also enter your water supply during erosion from natural deposits.

    LEARN MORE
  • Aluminum show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.2 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Aluminum in drinking water may potentially be toxic to the nervous system, with possible links to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Studies linking aluminum to human health remain inconclusive.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Aluminum can come into contact with drinking water sources from natural formations underground or from direct use as a water treatment coagulant or additive. It may also be released by metal refineries and mining operations.

    LEARN MORE
  • Iron show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.269 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Essential for your health vis-a-vis the transport of oxygen in your blood, iron in your drinking water may nonetheless cause stomach illness and other chronic pain, depending on your genetic makeup.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Iron is commonly found in most home drinking water. It comes from natural sources–like bedrock and soil–as well as from rusting pipes and water fixtures.

    TASTE & ODOR
    At moderate concentrations, iron will give water an unpleasant, metallic taste. Less than 1 PPM of iron may cause reddish-brown stains on your water fixtures and clothing.

    LEARN MORE
  • Lithium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.61 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Chronic oral exposure to high doses of lithium over time can disrupt the normal functioning of the thyroid gland, eventually leading to goiter (swelling of the thyroid gland). Lithium in drinking water has also interestingly been associated with reduced mental illness.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Lithium is a common element in the earth's bedrock. It can also enter your drinking water when there is contamination by leaking batteries, AC units, grease, electric cars, or pharmaceuticals.

    TASTE & ODOR
    There is no taste, odor, or color associated with high levels of lithium in drinking water.

    LEARN MORE
  • Strontium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.839 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Ingestion of small amounts of strontium is not harmful. With long-term chronic exposure at concentrations above 4 PPM, strontium may affect bone growth and impact children. There is less evidence suggesting impact on adults. High concentrations of radioactive strontium isotope, strontium-90 may cause cancer.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Dust, soil, foods and drinking water all contain small amounts of strontium. Geologic weathering leads to naturally-occurring strontium in the environment. Strontium-90 occurrence may also be linked to nuclear fallout and other anthropogenic sources such as air contamination from milling processes, coal burning, and phosphate fertilizers. However, high levels of strontium can occur in water drawn from bedrock aquifers that are rich in strontium minerals.

    LEARN MORE
  • Total Dissolved Solids show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    408 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    TDS is a general characteristic of water and does not itself have known health effects. However, the particulate materials that can cause high TDS may be harmful to human health.

    COMMON SOURCES
    As water travels over the land surface and through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals. TDS is a measure of all those dissolved particles in your water. It is a general characteristic of water rather than a specific chemical.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Water containing high TDS will often smell bad and taste bitter, salty or metallic

    LEARN MORE
  • Fluoride show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.98 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds. (MCL is 4)
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    High levels of fluoride in drinking water (>4 PPM) can cause bone disease and dental fluorosis. Such concentrations are rarely reached in public water systems and much more likely in private well water. Increasingly, there has been some research into the health effects of lower concentrations of fluoride when consumed in drinking water. It's unclear whether low concentrations of fluoride have negative health effects.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Fluoride in drinking water is commonly added by public water systems as an additive to protect teeth. Natural fluoride is also eroded from soil and rock deposits, used as a fertilizer, and commonly in the wastewater of aluminum intensive industries. It's unclear whether low concentrations of fluoride (added to water by public water systems) have any dental benefits considering how little time tap water stays in contact with your teeth (compared to toothpaste).

    LEARN MORE
  • Phosphorous show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    1.8 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Phosphorous concentrations found in drinking water are not associated with any health effects.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Phosphorus is commonly found in groundwater concentrations near agriculturally active areas because it is a common ingredient in fertilizer. Public water systems will also commonly add phosphates to the drinking water as a corrosion inhibitor to prevent lead and copper from leaching into your water from pipes and fixtures.

    LEARN MORE
  • Grains per gallon show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    3.88 Grains
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Water hardness (measured at GPG or Hardness) is not a known human health concern in drinking water.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Calcium and magnesium ions are commonly present in drinking water in various forms (sulfates, chlorides, carbonates and bicarbonates) which cause water to be hard. Water chemists measure these impurities in parts per million (ppm) and then mathematically convert them to a common unit of hardness called, grains of hardness per gallon of water (gpg).

    TASTE & ODOR
    Elevated water hardness affects pipe maintenance, water taste, and the ability of your water to form soap bubbles (laundry, dish washing, showering etc).

    LEARN MORE
  • Manganese show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.024 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds. (MCL is 0.5)
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of manganese (exposure over many years) has been associated with toxicity to the nervous system. Children and infants in particular are at risk of neurological damage if exposed to high levels of manganese in tap water (above 0.1 PPM). Adults are more tolerant and studies show long term exposure to manganese in water is considered safe below 0.3 PPM.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Manganese is a naturally occurring metal used in steel and corrosion-resistant aluminum alloys. Manganese is also an additive in unleaded gasoline, pigment, plumbing materials, battery cells, matches, fireworks, and fertilizer. It acts as a raeagent in organic chemistry and as an oxidizing agent.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Above 0.050 PPM you may notice a metallic taste, brownish-black or brownish-red color on toilets, shower curtains and sinks. Levels of manganese above 0.02 PPM may stain clothing.

    LEARN MORE
  • Potassium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    3 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Potassium is a vital human nutrient. There are no known human health impacts due to normal potassium levels in drinking water.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Potassium is found naturally occurring in many rocks and minerals. Erosion eventually washes it into water sources. Sudden increases in potassium levels could be due to increased oil and gas activity nearby a well.

    LEARN MORE
  • Hardness (Total) show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    64.71 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Total hardness is the sum of all hardness-contributing metals and minerals in your water. Mostly representative of calcium and magnesium, total hardness also includes contributions by barium, copper, zinc, iron, strontium and more. Total hardness is not toxic and not known to affect human health but some of the minor contributing metals that help comprise Total hardness may have health implications.

    COMMON SOURCES
    A minor contribution to the total hardness of water is made by the presence of other polyvalent ions like aluminum, copper, barium, iron, manganese, strontium, and zinc.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Total hardness is the sum of all hardness-contributing metals and minerals in your water. Mostly representative of calcium and magnesium, total hardness also includes contributions by barium, copper, zinc, iron, strontium and more. Water hardness may cause scaling and bad tasting tap water. Hardness contributes to white film on glassware and can make soap bubbles difficult to form.

    LEARN MORE
  • Molybdenum show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    19 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Not much is known about the long term health effects of molybdenum in drinking water, although there is some evidence very high exposure may result in higher serum uric acid levels and gout-like illness.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Molybdenum is a naturally-occurring metal found in small amounts in the bedrock. It is most commonly used in the production of steel and cast iron. It is also used for manufacturing electronic components, and pigments.

    LEARN MORE
  • Alkalinity (as CaCO3) show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    50 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    Determined by the properties of minerals dissolved in your water. It's a measure of your water's capacity to resist changes to pH. Strongly alkaline water has an objectionable taste that resembles baking soda.
  • Calcium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    14 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    No significant health effects are associated with drinking calcium in your water. In fact, calcium is one of many minerals found naturally in water and essential to your health.

    COMMON SOURCES
    As water enters the atmosphere it gets enriched with carbon dioxide (and forms a compound called carbonic acid). Later in the water cycle, that same water seeps into the ground and comes into contact with calcium-rich stone. The carbonic-acid-water extracts calcium from the stone and carries it through your pipes to your tap.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Calcium has its own taste receptors on your tongue. A high concentration can taste bitter or sour. Some people enjoy the flavor it imparts on their water, but too much of it contributes to hardness and can form scale in your pipes.

    LEARN MORE
  • Hardness (Ca,Mg) show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    43.19 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Hardness is mostly representative of the calcium and magnesium in your water, both are essential ions for your health and are not regulated as toxins by the US EPA. Hardness measuring from 0 - 60 PPM is considered "soft"; 60 - 120 PPM is considered "moderately hard"; above 120 is "hard".

    COMMON SOURCES
    Hardness is mostly a measure of the calcium and magnesium levels in your water. Calcium and magnesium typically dissolve into your water from soil and rock that are naturally occurring in the ground.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Hardness is mostly representative of the calcium and magnesium in your water, both are essential ions for your health and are not regulated as toxins by the US EPA. Water hardness may cause scaling and bad tasting tap water. Hardness contributes to white film on glassware and can make soap bubbles difficult to form.
  • Thallium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.00014 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds. (MCL is 0.002)
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    High levels of thallium in drinking water can cause hair loss; changes in blood chemistry; kidney, intestinal, or liver problems

    COMMON SOURCES
    Thallium is a naturally occurring element found in soil, and also a waste product of ore-processing and drug manufacturing facilities, mineral smelters and coal-burning facilities.

    LEARN MORE
  • Sodium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    7 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Sodium is important to your body for maintaining blood pressure, controlling fluid levels and keeping healthy nerve and muscle function. Sodium levels in drinking water are not normally a health concern (especially when compared to the sodium you consume from food) but it's important to always ask your doctor for such advice, especially if you're sensitive to high sodium levels.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Sodium is commonly detected and tasted in drinking water. Saline intrusion, mineral deposits, seawater spray, sewage effluents, and road salts used in de-icing can all contribute significantly to sodium levels in drinking water. In addition, water treatment chemicals and water softeners can increase sodium levels at the tap.

    TASTE & ODOR
    Sodium produces a salty taste in drinking water that can be detected (depending on someone's age) between 30 and 460 ppm.

    LEARN MORE
  • Boron show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    0.003 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    Long term exposure to high levels of boron can lead to developmental and reproductive effects (testicular atrophy, spermatogenesis). There is some evidence of reduced sexual function in men.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Boron is often naturally occurring in earth and comes in contact with groundwater. It may also leach or runoff from industrial uses.

    LEARN MORE
  • Magnesium show more
    YOUR MEASUREMENT
    2 PPM
    Does not exceed any recommended thresholds.
    HEALTH EFFECTS
    There are no known direct human health impacts from magnesium in your water.

    COMMON SOURCES
    Magnesium is a key component of water hardness and is found naturally occurring in many rocks and minerals. Erosion eventually washes it into water sources. Sudden increases in magnesium levels could be due to increased oil and gas activity nearby a well.

    TASTE & ODOR
    While magnesium can make your water taste better, too much of it can contribute to hard water and form scale in your pipes.

    LEARN MORE
  • Antimony show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Arsenic show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Barium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Beryllium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Cadmium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Cerium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Chloride show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Cobalt show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Copper show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Mercury show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Nitrate (as N) show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Selenium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Silver show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Sulfate show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Tin show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Titanium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Uranium show more Tested, Not Detected
  • Vanadium learn more Tested, Not Detected
  • Langelier Saturation Index show more NORMAL (-0.33)

Understanding your Tap Score

First time reading a Tap Score Report? This section explains what all the bars and colors mean.

SimpleWater's health risks analysis compares your sample’s contaminant levels to the latest publicly available toxicological and epidemiological research. This is done in order to give you a clear idea of what potential risks may be in your water. Click on each contaminant to learn more about its known health impacts and potential sources. This analysis should not be taken as professional health advice.

  • GOOD - You're In The Clear
    If your result is to the left of the middle line it means we detected this contaminant but at a concentration that is not known to cause health problems for healthy adults.

  • ELEVATED - Approximate Risk Factor < 1 in 100,000
    Drinking water contaminated at this level is not immediately concerning but is worthwhile monitoring since concentrations may vary over time and there may be a small long term health risk.

  • MODERATE - Approximate Risk Factor > 1 in 100,000
    Drinking water contaminated at this level over several years is thought to pose a moderate health risk. If you drink this water frequently it's worth considering treatment.

  • HIGH - Approximate Risk Factor > 1 in 10,000
    Drinking water contaminated at this level over several years is thought to pose a significant health risk that should not be ignored. We do not recommend drinking this water without treatment.

  • VERY HIGH - Approximate Risk Factor > 1 in 1,000
    Drinking water water contaminated at this level is thought to pose a high risk to your health. If possible, other water sources should be used or appropriate water treatment should be installed.

  • What do diagonal lines mean?
    Simply, they mean that any concentration of this contaminant is potentially harmful.

Recommended treatment solutions for your address

Tap Score's treatment recommendations are unbiased and designed to help you reduce and remediate your contamination risks in an informed manner. If you have any questions, we're here to help.

Point of Use Systems

Lead and Nickel pose a potential health risk when ingested with your drinking water (though they are not usually a concern in the shower, for example). The following Point of Use water treatment products have been matched to treat these contaminants.

Matching: Lead, Nickel

ZeroWater 6-Cup Pitcher

GO TO STORE

Chromium (Hexavalent) Reduction ; Lead Reduction ; Mercury Reduction X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

CERTIFIED TO REDUCE

Lead - VIEW ALL

LIKELY TO REDUCE *

Nickel

Purchase Cost: $26
Expected Yearly Cost: $90
FEATURES Installation / Type Pour Through
TECHNOLOGIES Activated Carbon Filter Ion Exchange
CAPACITY Small Storage (0.375 gal)

iSpring RCC7

GO TO STORE

Arsenic (pentavalent) Reduction (< 50 ppb) ; Barium Reduction ; Cadmium Reduction ; Chromium (Hexavalent) Reduction ; Copper Reduction ; Fluoride Reduction ; Lead Reduction ; Selenium Reduction ; TDS Reduction X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

CERTIFIED TO REDUCE

Lead - VIEW ALL

LIKELY TO REDUCE *

Nickel

Purchase Cost: $186
Expected Yearly Cost: $90
FEATURES Installation / Type Under-Sink
TECHNOLOGIES Reverse Osmosis Activated Carbon Filter
CAPACITY Medium Storage (3.2 gal) Medium Flow Rate (0.5 gpm)

Aquasana OptimH2O Reverse Osmosis + Claryum

GO TO STORE

Arsenic (pentavalent) Reduction (< 300 ppb) ; Asbestos Reduction ; Barium Reduction ; Cadmium Reduction ; Chromium (hexavalent) Reduction ; Copper Reduction ; Fluoride Reduction ; Ibuprofen Reduction ; Lead Reduction ; Mercury Reduction ; MTBE Reduction ; Naproxen Reduction ; Nitrate/Nitrite Reduction ; Nonylphenol Reduction ; PFOA Reduction ; PFOS Reduction ; Selenium Reduction ; Styrene Reduction ; TDS Reduction ; Turbidity Reduction ; VOC Reduction X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

CERTIFIED TO REDUCE

Lead - VIEW ALL

LIKELY TO REDUCE *

Nickel

Purchase Cost: $249
Expected Yearly Cost: $220
FEATURES Installation / Type Under-Sink
TECHNOLOGIES Activated Carbon Filter Reverse Osmosis
CAPACITY Medium Storage (3.2 gal) Medium Flow Rate (0.5 gpm)

Aquasana Claryum (Above Counter)

GO TO STORE

Asbestos Reduction ; Ibuprofen Reduction ; Lead Reduction ; Mercury Reduction ; MTBE Reduction ; Naproxen Reduction ; Nonylphenol Reduction ; PFOA Reduction ; PFOS Reduction ; Turbidity Reduction ; VOC Reduction X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

CERTIFIED TO REDUCE

Lead - VIEW ALL

DOES NOT REDUCE: Nickel
Purchase Cost: $65
Expected Yearly Cost: $120
FEATURES Installation / Type Counter-Top
TECHNOLOGIES Catalytic Carbon Activated Carbon Filter Ion Exchange
CAPACITY Medium Flow Rate (0.5 gpm)
view more options

Point of Entry Systems

The contaminants detected in your water sample are primarily considered a risk only when ingested via drinking water. As long as your tap water is treated at the main Point of Use (i.e. your sink), there's not a strong need to install whole-home treatment. Nevertheless, some customers may want to install preventative whole-home treatment with some of the options listed below.

Matching (JIC): Lead, Nickel

US Water US Water Defender Whole House Reverse Osmosis (Base Model)

GO TO STORE

X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

LIKELY TO REDUCE *

Lead ; Nickel

Purchase Cost: $6,995
Expected Yearly Cost: $426
FEATURES Installation / Type Point of Entry Maintenance Indicator Capacity Monitor (total treated)
TECHNOLOGIES Activated Carbon Filter Reverse Osmosis UV Lamp
CAPACITY Large Storage (250 gal) Medium Flow Rate (0.5 gpm)

Home Master 2 Stage Water Filtration System with Multi Gradient Sediment and KDF85/Catalytic Carbon (HMF2SMGCC)

GO TO STORE

X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

LIKELY TO REDUCE *

Lead

DOES NOT REDUCE: Nickel
Purchase Cost: $367
Expected Yearly Cost: $156
FEATURES Installation / Type Point of Entry
TECHNOLOGIES Catalytic Carbon Copper Zinc Water Filtration
CAPACITY High Flow Rate (2 gpm)

Aquasana Rhino EQ-600 Whole House Water Filter (Base Model)

GO TO STORE

X

These are treatment assumptions based on our understanding of the technologies used by this product, manufacturer claims, and the surrogate testing preformed by a certification agency. Not all products become certified for everything they are capable of reducing. X

X

LIKELY TO REDUCE *

Lead

DOES NOT REDUCE: Nickel
Purchase Cost: $645
Expected Yearly Cost: $236
FEATURES Installation / Type Point of Entry
TECHNOLOGIES Activated Carbon Filter Copper Zinc Water Filtration
CAPACITY High Flow Rate (7 gpm)
view more options

As a reminder, Tap Score has no special affiliation with any of the recommended treatment product companies. However, if you make a purchase from our Amazon links, we do earn a small affiliate fee. Nonetheless, we encourage you to find the best deal you can.

We cannot guarantee the accuracy of the contaminant reduction claims listed for each product. Water treatment is a complicated topic and we are here to help. Contact us for help from a water treatment professional.

Next steps

  • Share your results

    Help your community by sharing your results. This link displays a version of your report that does not show your personal information.

    https://mytap.us/C8U4G3
  • You may want to consider these tests

    • Because your level of Chromium (Total) was 0.02 PPM or higher

      Total chromium is the sum of three forms of chromium. Chrome-0, chrome-3 and chrome-6. Hexavalent chromium (Chrome-6) is the most poisonous form of total chromium found in drinking water. Since you have high levels of total chromium in your water sample, you might want to do a followup test to figure out how much of your total chromium is hexavalent chromium. LEARN MORE

  • Save your self-test results

    Select a self-test from the list below to begin adding your observations and results.

  • Schedule a re-test reminder

  • Learn more about your water

    The Lead In School Drinking Water Database

    SimpleWater's Lead In School Water Project is the first web-based application to rank and track every US state in terms of school-related lead exposure, testing and policy. This project’s goal is to provide a free public resource for parents, facility managers and regulators to monitor the latest data on their school’s waterborne lead concentrations.

    Store-Bought Lead Tests: Are They Worth It?

    Did you know that your tap water may contain potential threats even if your water supplier is in compliance with federal lead contamination regulations? A popular option is a home test for your tap water. Sounds like an easy way to get informed about the safety of your drinking water….right?

  • Get answers to your questions

Local water quality

Based on your reported testing location of:
East Capitol St NE & First St SE, Washington, DC 20004

This is some information about nearby water systems that may be useful when considering ongoing risks to your drinking water.

You can click here to learn more about this data.

Attached Files

Your report has an attached file with additional information.